Posts Tagged ‘greens’

Are you getting bored with your vegetable dishes? If you are, maybe it’s because you are cooking the same vegetables the same way every time. We all know that we need to eat our vegetables because they are good for us, and our bodies need all those vitamins and minerals to be healthy. Besides our bodies, our minds, taste buds and appetites need to be nourished as well. Our vegetable dishes should be exciting, appetizing and delicious, motivating us to eat even more vegetables.

There are over a dozen different ways to cook vegetables, so if you usually steam or saute them, maybe it’s time to try something new. All veggies are not created equal, and some may taste better roasted while others are best grilled. The more you know, the more you will get the most delicious taste out of your veggies. Let’s go over the different methods of cooking vegetables and pick up some recipe ideas along the way. → Read more

When you come across a new vegetable and you are not quite sure what to do with it, try roasting it. Roasted vegetables taste like nothing else. They get brown and crisp on the outside. Their natural sugars caramelize, making them sweet and concentrating their veggie flavor. Whether you are going to eat them straight from the oven or use them in a veggie burger, you won’t want to miss the intense flavor that is only brought out by roasting. Roasting is also one of the easiest, hands-off ways to cook. Turn on the oven, cut up the veggies, toss them in some oil and seasoning, slide the tray in the oven and walk away. Roasting is a great way to cook a lot at one time while leaving the stovetop free for other dishes. One pan makes for easy clean-up too. Here is a handy guide to roasting vegetables along with well over a dozen recipe ideas at the end. Print it out and hang it on your fridge. Then sharpen your knives, turn on the oven and get ready to roast. → Read more

We know they’re good for us, but some days it can be harder than others to get our greens in! We’ve come up with 10 easy ways for you to add more greens to your day so you can benefit from all of their cleansing, alkalizing properties even when life gets crazy! → Read more

By Huffington Post

Ron Finley is a successful clothing designer and artist from Los Angeles whose life got a little dirtier when he realized something strange about his neighborhood.

He found that South Central, Los Angeles was overwhelmingly filled with “Liquor stores. Fast food. Vacant lots,” but had no great place to get fresh, affordable produce. “People are losing their homes, they’re hungry, they’re unemployed, and this area is so underserved with nutritional food.” Finley was quoted as saying.

Since he’d just taken a course on gardening at the Natural History Museum, he decided to put his newfound knowledge to good use and planted a garden in a small strip of grass by his house with the help of his teacher, Florence Nishida and some friends.

Even though Finley used a small plot of land, about 10 feet wide, 150 feet long, the city still gave him a citation, which eventually turned into a warrant. His garden, filled with tomatoes, peppers and chard, celery, kale and herbs, had been deemed illegal.

Luckily with the help of LA Green Grounds, a charity he co-founded to help spread gardens throughout Los Angeles, Finley managed to overcome the citation, with the additional encouragement of his councilman, Herb Wesson. LA Green Grounds continues to help communities acquire gardening skills and grow their own produce, “And it always amazes me how planting a bunch of seeds or plants really can change someone’s life as they watch it grow, and then harvest it. I’ve seen people light up and literally change before my eyes.” Finley explains.

“Growing your own food is like printing your own money,” Finley said in his TED talk. He has educated his community in the importance of gardening as a sustainable, cost-effective and healthy activity in the hopes the can help turn these “food deserts” into “food forests.”

Finley perfectly sums up the significance of his gardening movement with this very promising observation: “If kids grow kale, kids eat kale!”

X